St. Francis’s Blessing of the Animals

There is a beautiful tradition I observe every year on October 4th, with our household pets. It is a holy day in the Roman Catholic church — The Feast of St. Francis. Though I may not always get over to church for the formal ceremony, I do a “Pet Blessing” for each of our cats, and even sprinkle holy water on them (though they don’t like it!). St. Francis of Assisi is my patron saint, as I am a wildlife conservationist and promote a vegan lifestyle, which does not exploit animals for food or clothing. I love that Pope Francis models himself after the “poor man of Assisi” with his kindness, compassion, and humble manner. I highly recommend the following book written by the Holy Father, for anyone who loves God’s creations and desires to protect them, and preserve the sanctity of Mother Nature:   https://tinyurl.com/y2bnfgnb

In addition, and in keeping with the Patron Saint of animals, ecology, nature and our ecosystem, here’s the statement from Pope Francis on “World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation” issued September 1st this year:  https://tinyurl.com/y4vmvlf9

I’ve compiled some relevant images to share on this special day, in celebration of our fellow beings! Click on any image to learn more.

Spending more time in the natural world, away from technology, is incredibly healing and restorative. Praying Nature with St. Francis of Assisi shows us the way: http://www.praying-nature.com/site_pages.php?section=Guide+for+Nature+Lovers

And here is the “Blessing of the Animals” for at-home observance with your beloved pets:

God of all creation, at the beginning of time you gave us beautiful creatures of the earth as our fellow beings. And in your wisdom, these animals, like all good things from you, became more than that. They became our friends and companions. Loving St. Francis considered animals of all species his brothers and sisters. We ask you, therefore, to bless them in the natural world, and our own beloved ___pet name(s)___, that they may have a long and joyful life. Keep them safe when we cannot be with them, protect them from sickness and harm and heal their wounds. And bless us too, their human companions, with your Holy Spirit that we may care for our pets well, and be wise, gentle stewards of every one of your creatures and the earth, Mother to all life.

We ask this in the name of your Son Jesus, who is Lord of all forever and ever. Amen.

For a radiantly beautiful and inspiring picture of St. Francis blessing eight dogs, birds and other creatures:  https://tinyurl.com/y2trncsc

Have a blessed day, with your special friends!

New Year’s Intentions and Being Kind :-) Encore for 2017!

“So much has been happening lately. This blog post truly resonates with me as much now as a year ago – ohmygosh, even more so!  I offer it again to you, and hope reading this can help soothe your nerves and calm your busy mind as well.” ~ Jacqueline

I am definitely DONE with “New Year’s Resolutions”, and grappling with halfhearted attempts at changing myself for the better. Is anyone else tired of resolutions (however sincerely made) that fizzle out? Do you start out chugging along with high hopes of major personal transformation and by February, you’re losing steam and don’t feel worthy of being anyone’s Valentine? I’ve a very sneaky suspicion I’m not the only one who feels that way.

I’ve discovered that having high expectations just sets yourself up for disappointment. Why? Because they are so often a mixture of what other people expect of you, and unrealistic demands on yourself. These resolutions can be trite: “I’ve got to lose weight this year!” or grandiose, such as “This is the year I make my first million $$” which is not likely to happen, unless you’re already a successful investor. Both statements are so rigid and absolute as not to allow intuitive flow. It’s good to set goals and have a detailed plan to achieve them, but give yourself a little wiggle room so you can celebrate the incremental progress you make along the way. Think “baby steps” and notice whenever you are inching toward your goal, like inches off your waistline even though the scales don’t show any different.

Sometimes just getting back to basics will relieve the pressure of “accomplishment”. Be kind to yourself despite disappointment, say “Hi!” to your neighbors instead of ignoring them. Sure it has nothing to do with losing weight or making money, but you’re planting seeds and cultivating NEW habits. You’ll start feeling better about yourself. Really! I know it sounds simplistic, but it’s true.

When you make an effort to be thoughtful, considerate and kind toward others, your focus is off yourself, therefore no pressure. 🙂 Then progress toward your goals becomes more effortless, since you’re not thinking of it and “Voila!” things seem to naturally fall into place. Serendipity is the reward for intentional kindness.

I haven’t stated here my own personal intentions. No matter, I simply wanted to share some insights with my readers, and especially what I learned from Jack Canfield. He said, “Have high intentions, and low attachment.” Intention is not the same as expectation. With intention, you have no expectation of any particular outcome (non-attachment) but instead rely upon faith that you’ve chosen the right path… The learning and personal growth is after all in the journey, not the destination.

Someday I will be somebody’s mentor as Jack is for me, and my salient advice will be what I’ve said all along: “Do your best and leave the rest up to God.”

New Year’s Intentions and Being Kind :-) Encore for 2017!

“So much has been happening lately. This blog post truly resonates with me as much now as a year ago – ohmygosh, even more so!  I offer it again to you, and hope reading this can help soothe your nerves and calm your busy mind as well.” ~ Jacqueline

I am definitely DONE with “New Year’s Resolutions”, and grappling with halfhearted attempts at changing myself for the better. Is anyone else tired of resolutions (however sincerely made) that fizzle out? Do you start out chugging along with high hopes of major personal transformation and by February, you’re losing steam and don’t feel worthy of being anyone’s Valentine? I’ve a very sneaky suspicion I’m not the only one who feels that way.

I’ve discovered that having high expectations just sets yourself up for disappointment. Why? Because they are so often a mixture of what other people expect of you, and unrealistic demands on yourself. These resolutions can be trite: “I’ve got to lose weight this year!” or grandiose, such as “This is the year I make my first million $$” which is not likely to happen, unless you’re already a successful investor. Both statements are so rigid and absolute as not to allow intuitive flow. It’s good to set goals and have a detailed plan to achieve them, but give yourself a little wiggle room so you can celebrate the incremental progress you make along the way. Think “baby steps” and notice whenever you are inching toward your goal, like inches off your waistline even though the scales don’t show any different.

Sometimes just getting back to basics will relieve the pressure of “accomplishment”. Be kind to yourself despite disappointment, say “Hi!” to your neighbors instead of ignoring them. Sure it has nothing to do with losing weight or making money, but you’re planting seeds and cultivating NEW habits. You’ll start feeling better about yourself. Really! I know it sounds simplistic, but it’s true.

When you make an effort to be thoughtful, considerate and kind toward others, your focus is off yourself, therefore no pressure. 🙂 Then progress toward your goals becomes more effortless, since you’re not thinking of it and “Voila!” things seem to naturally fall into place. Serendipity is the reward for intentional kindness.

I haven’t stated here my own personal intentions. No matter, I simply wanted to share some insights with my readers, and especially what I learned from Jack Canfield. He said, “Have high intentions, and low attachment.” Intention is not the same as expectation. With intention, you have no expectation of any particular outcome (non-attachment) but instead rely upon faith that you’ve chosen the right path… The learning and personal growth is after all in the journey, not the destination.

Someday I will be somebody’s mentor as Jack is for me, and my salient advice will be what I’ve said all along: “Do your best and leave the rest up to God.”