Wisdom Wednesday: A Humane Nation After All

Dearest All,
Now that it’s said and done, we can still lift our hearts and rejoice in some good that came of this election. What encouragement Wayne Pacelle provides here!! People coming together to support protection of animals.  He is president of HSUS, Humane Society of the United States: http://blog.humanesociety.org/wayne/2016/11/voters-say-no-factory-farming-wildlife-trafficking.html

These states voted against factory farming and wildlife trafficking — YEA! Massachusetts (78-22%!), Oregon (70%-30%), Oklahoma (60.3 percent “no” vote). I think it’s pretty neat this spells the acronym M.O.O.! – Thank you for your sensitivity to factory farm animals’ plight and commitment to protect wildlife. Your voices were heard, loud and clear!

We need to speak up for other sentient beings who cannot, at least not in a language we humans can understand!

I don’t mean to gloss over the injustice of an overly ambitious yet under qualified person being elected President of the United States, I simply want to focus on the compassionate outcome of a burgeoning Humane Nation. Yes, to be human is to be “humane”. Louie Schwartzberg said it best in his interview on Oprah’s “Super Soul Sunday”:
“ We are hard-wired to protect that which we love.” And the natural world has so much to offer us — incredible beauty and  miraculous transformations (like from caterpillar to butterfly). Here’s a video of this cinematographer’s highly-acclaimed TED talk, “Gratitude”. Indeed, his audience fell in love with what they saw. Enjoy watching in awe and wonder!

Peace & Love to All,

Jacqueline

This just in — Breaking News!! — November 23, 2016 @ 11:32am

Friend,

We have exceeded our $10,000 goal for Kiko’s Fund, and your generous support helped put us over the top.

Thank you!

As we celebrate Thanksgiving this week, the Nonhuman Rights Project is thankful for your support for Kiko, Tommy, Hercules, Leo and all of our future nonhuman plaintiffs.

We have many significant, groundbreaking legal battles ahead. Thanks to you, we’re closer than ever to securing freedom for—and bringing unprecedented rights to—these great apes and other self-aware, autonomous nonhuman animals living in captivity all over the world.

On behalf of Kiko, Tommy, Hercules, Leo, and all of the NhRP’s future plaintiffs, thank you for making it all possible.

We’ll see you in court!

Steven M. Wise
President
The Nonhuman Rights Project

Serene Sunday: Awaken Your Senses to Nature’s Wonders!

I have just finished watching the DVD on Findhorn Retreat with Eckhart Tolle, which was recorded in 2004 in Scotland. Wish I had been there! A beautiful location in a serene environment that is the perfect setting for its theme: “Stillness Amidst The World”, and good reason for this encore presentation of one of my most popular posts, from November, 2014. Eckhart Tolle speaks of being in the present moment, and seeing the miracles inherent in Nature, without the filter of labeling or identifying what we see in front of us. It’s like merging with the formless (which is spirit), and recognizing that we are part of everything around us. The following quotes beautifully embrace the sacred within the ordinary… Enjoy!

“Connection with gardens, even small ones, even potted plants, can become windows to the inner life. The simple act of stopping and looking at the beauty around us can be prayer.”
– Patricia R. Barrett, The Sacred Garden

“The first act of awe, when man was struck with the beauty or wonder of Nature, was the first spiritual experience.”
– Henryk Skolimowski

“Even before I could speak, I remember crawling through blueberry patches in the wild meadows on our hillsides. I quickly discovered Nature was filled with Spirit; I never saw any separation between Spirit and Nature. Much later I discovered our culture taught there was supposed to be some kind of separation – that God, Spirit and Nature were supposed to be divided and different. However, at my early age it seemed absolutely obvious that the church of the Earth was the greatest church of all; that the temple of the forest was the supreme temple. When I went to the sanctuary of the mountain, I found Earth’s natural altar – Great Spirit’s real shrine. Years later I discovered that this path of going into Nature, bonding deeply with it, and seeing Spirit within Nature – God, Goddess, and Great Spirit – was humanity’s most ancient, most primordial path of spiritual cultivation and realization.”
– John P. Milton, Sky Above, Earth Below

“In all things of Nature there is something marvellous.”
– Aristotle

Awakening

“In the assemblies of the enlightened ones there have been many cases of mastering the Way bringing forth the heart of plants and trees; this is what awakening the mind for enlightenment is like. The fifth patriarch of Zen was once a pine-planting wayfarer; Rinzai worked on planting cedars and pines on Mount Obaku. … Working with plants, trees, fences and walls, if they practice sincerely they will attain enlightenment.”

– Dogen Zenji, Japanese Zen Buddhist Grand Master, Awakening the Unsurpassed Mind, #31

“Scent is the most potent and bewitching substance in the
gardener’s repertory and yet it is the most neglected and
least understood. The faintest waft is sometimes enough
to induce feelings of hunger or anticipation, or to transport
you back through time and space to a long-forgotten moment
in your childhood. It can overwhelm you in an instant or simply
tease you, creeping into your consciousness slowly and
evaporating almost the moment it is detected. Each fragrance,
whether sweet or spicy, light or heavy, comes upon you
in its own way and evokes its own emotional response.”
– Stephen Lacey, Scent in Your Garden, 1991

“To be overcome by the fragrance of flowers is a delectable form of defeat.”
– Beverly Nichols

“I go to Nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.”
– John Burroughs

My lilac trees are old and tall;
I cannot reach their bloom at all.
They send their perfume over trees
And roof and streets, to find the bees.
– Lousie Driscoll, 1875 – 1957, My Garden Is a Pleasant Place

“Perfumes are the feelings of flowers.”
– Heinrich Heine

And so it is, ever was and ever shall be. Praise God and all of Mother Nature! May you have a happy “Leap Year”, and be grateful for the extra day to love and appreciate all that the natural world has to offer. 🙂

Feel Good Friday :-)

I’m starting a regular column today on a simple topic: Feeling Good. I have experienced so many moments of joy and even bliss that I got to the point where I just have to share. Otherwise, I feel like I’m somehow being selfish! But I’ve been told that sharing is caring and each time we experience a good feeling, it’s natural and desirable to “spread it around”, like delicious homemade jam on freshly baked bread. 🙂

And while you’re basking in this yummy metaphor, keep in mind that enjoying food though really nice is but a temporary “high”. I believe that now more than ever we need – no I should say we “crave” – a real, a genuine connection to the natural world. Appreciating the beauty of God’s creations yields more “feel good” moments that have a lasting effect for me (and most people), and they’re blissfully therapeutic!!

Here’s an excerpt from Louie Schwartzberg’s “Moving Art” blog. He’s the filmmaker and photographer whose “Gratitude” documentary film went viral on YouTube this year:

“When you’ve felt depressed or stressed out, have you ever decided to go for a walk among the trees or visit a beach to watch the waves roll in? How did you feel after you spent time in Nature? Experience has shown us that Nature is one of the best natural healers we have available to us… Going on a long walk and taking time to experience the awe of Nature has shown that it can lower levels of cytokines; according to the article, “chronically high levels of cytokines have been linked to a number of health problems, including heart disease, Alzheimer’s, depression and autoimmune conditions.”

There’s a name for this kind of dis-ease, and it’s Nature Deficit Disorder (NDD) and the worst example is our sedentary kids. Children used to run, laugh, play outdoors, skin their knees and jump in piles of leaves. These days, they spend most of their time with iPhones, iPads, and read e-books on Kindle or other devices. But that’s another angle of this story, and I want to continue feeling good and sharing moments of peace, love and happiness, so there!

Speaking of which, check out Louie’s time-lapse photography, which is what’s made him famous:  http://movingart.com/magicflowers/

And while this app is only available now on Mac and all the Apple contingents, that is changing and they are in the process of creating a cross platform. I just got off the phone with Elise at the company, so no worries!

And here’s another feel good moment to leave with you, from one of my poet friends:

      View on Twitter       

Beauty opens our heart. . . Indeed, so very true!!

Please share with me your own “feel good” moments that you recall. Who knows? I may even make a movie about them! 🙂

Wisdom Wednesday: Humor in Nature’s Little Wonders :-)

Here is another 15 minute “free write”, just as I did 3 weeks ago. Pardon the time lapse, and I have no excuse! My intention is to post on my blog at least twice a week, and I have more than enough material, believe you me! 🙂

Sometimes we find wisdom in unusual places, or from unexpected situations that often go unnoticed. Witness the following, and bear in mind my writing here is free-flowing, unedited, no spell check, and uncensored!

“How doth the busy little bumble bee go about her daily spree? She is heavyweight, not at all lite enough for flight. Does it matter in the least, tho she be quite a tiny beast! Stories say the bumble bee is industrious as can possibly be. She defies the law of gravity by flying high and defty moving from blossum to blossum and fulfilling her dream… The busy little bumblebee is so coordinated and graceful. So why should it matter that she has a fat ass? When you watch this fair creature in action, you have to marvel at her ease and grace, despite her amply endowed midriff. Bees don’t care about that “Fol de Rol” and such a discriminatory frame of mind. Let’s bee more generous about all beings who are larger than “normal” and admire and appreciate their many attributes. There is much to admire about the bumblebee. I have to watch myself around her, lest I get stung. However, I am careful and I don’t bother her, as she goes about her buzzing business, and she probably doesn’t notice me. All bees are hardworkers in the aminal kingdom and always fulfill their purpose each day. They have an innate wisdom and built-in time clock, knowing they have to finish their work before dusk or sundown, and be back at the hive well before dark. That’s why you never see a bee at night. I have encountered them in and around swimming pools. One time, I had to rescue a bee in the water, and get her to safety just outside the pool. I set her down gently, said a prayer and blew on her — what I call the “breath of life”. It would be rather difficult to give mouth to mouth resuscitation to a honeybee, wouldn’t it? Anywho, the honeybee did recover and flew away.  I was happy and so relieved.  I had just saved a life~!”

Thankful Thursday: When you save a life, you save yourself!

“Whoever destroys a soul, it is considered as if he destroyed an entire world. And whoever saves a life, it is considered as if he saved an entire world.” — Mishnah Sanhedrin 4:9; Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Sanhedrin 37a.

I’ve always believed that our planet is blessed with interconnected species, and we benefit from each other. I give thanks every day for God’s gifts of the miracles of Nature all around me. This quote from the Talmud implies that we humans need to live in accordance with the laws governing the natural world, and that each and every life is worthy and sacred. So in thinking about how this is relevant in my own life, I would say that saving a life in this context includes other animal species, not just human beings. All life on earth is synergistic and inter-dependent, as shown very beautifully in the film “Avatar”. There is an inherent respect for animal and plant species by the indiginous people, and never any thought of selfish acquisition or abuse of another species. And these people clearly recognize that all sentient beings have souls, as without our corporeal forms which are only needed while on earth, we are all pure energy and light (soul essence of our being) and vibrating together. So you cannot affect one life without consequence to others, including your own.

In the most obvious way, if you’re a wildlife conservationist and you have rare white male and female tigers bred in captivity to save the species, you’ve saved one (well, really two) to “save” the entire species from extinction. But in a broader sense, it’s like pebbles in the pond, as when I’ve saved a fallen bird from the clutches of one of our cats (don’t worry, they get plenty of food from us!) and the entire bird colony can rest just a little easier. And I feel grateful and “saved” as well… It’s those good, protective vibes I put out for all of God’s creatures. Word gets around!

Awaken Your Senses; There’s Wonders to Behold!

I have been remiss in not blogging for over a month! In my defense, I’ve been grappling with a turning point in my life – nothing tragic, just very challenging – and it opened my eyes and heart, making me rethink my priorities in a big way!! I really needed a respite with my first love, POETRY, so in that spirit I have chosen these beautiful poems to feature here. They are quoted from “The Fragrance Of Life”, attributed to a fellow blogger and spiritualist who I much admire @inspiringyoursp Thank you and God bless you! 🙂

“Connection with gardens, even small ones, even potted plants, can become windows to the inner life. The simple act of stopping and looking at the beauty around us can be prayer.”
– Patricia R. Barrett, The Sacred Garden

“The first act of awe, when man was struck with the beauty or wonder of Nature, was the first spiritual experience.”
– Henryk Skolimowski

“Even before I could speak, I remember crawling through blueberry patches in the wild meadows on our hillsides. I quickly discovered Nature was filled with Spirit; I never saw any separation between Spirit and Nature. Much later I discovered our culture taught there was supposed to be some kind of separation – that God, Spirit and Nature were supposed to be divided and different. However, at my early age it seemed absolutely obvious that the church of the Earth was the greatest church of all; that the temple of the forest was the supreme temple. When I went to the sanctuary of the mountain, I found Earth’s natural altar – Great Spirit’s real shrine. Years later I discovered that this path of going into Nature, bonding deeply with it, and seeing Spirit within Nature – God, Goddess, and Great Spirit – was humanity’s most ancient, most primordial path of spiritual cultivation and realization.”
– John P. Milton, Sky Above, Earth Below

“In all things of Nature there is something marvellous.”
– Aristotle

Awakening

“In the assemblies of the enlightened ones there have been many cases of mastering the Way bringing forth the heart of plants and trees; this is what awakening the mind for enlightenment is like. The fifth patriarch of Zen was once a pine-planting wayfarer; Rinzai worked on planting cedars and pines on Mount Obaku. … Working with plants, trees, fences and walls, if they practice sincerely they will attain enlightenment.”

– Dogen Zenji, Japanese Zen Buddhist Grand Master, Awakening the Unsurpassed Mind, #31

Scent is the most potent and bewitching substance in the
gardener’s repertory and yet it is the most neglected and
least understood. The faintest waft is sometimes enough
to induce feelings of hunger or anticipation, or to transport
you back through time and space to a long-forgotten moment
in your childhood. It can overwhelm you in an instant or simply
tease you, creeping into your consciousness slowly and
evaporating almost the moment it is detected. Each fragrance,
whether sweet or spicy, light or heavy, comes upon you
in its own way and evokes its own emotional response.
– Stephen Lacey, Scent in Your Garden, 1991

To be overcome by the fragrance of flowers
is a delectable form of defeat.
– Beverly Nichols

I go to Nature to be soothed and healed,
and to have my senses put in order.
– John Burroughs

My lilac trees are old and tall;
I cannot reach their bloom at all.
They send their perfume over trees
And roof and streets, to find the bees.
– Lousie Driscoll, 1875 – 1957, My Garden Is a Pleasant Place

Perfumes are the feelings of flowers.
– Heinrich Heine

And so it is, ever was and ever shall be. Praise God and all of Mother Nature!

Serene Sunday: Mother Nature’s Hidden Eyes and Ears

I have proof positive that plants can TALK…and actually HEAR what’s going on around them. What?! you say… That’s ridiculous! Without mouths, without ears???

Not only that, but we humans can communicate with them! It takes time and patience, but well worth the effort. 🙂

Charles Darwin, 150 years ago, imagined a world far busier, noisier and more intimate than the world we can see and hear. Our senses are pitifully weak. The world is buzzing all around us. Darwin sensed this. “Let it be borne in mind how infinitely close-fitting are the mutual relations of all organic beings to each other,” he wrote. He was speaking of the intricate web of life — the interrelationship of animal, plant, mineral kingdoms and lively interplay of communication which we humans generally ignore. Darwin was way ahead of his time. He must have been, to give in to wild imaginings of talking plants and earthworm wisdom!

Fast forward 145 years, and you have another “man ahead of his time” with a film about strange blue people living in a rainforest and referring to a big tree as their “mother”. Avatar was a landmark film that showcased Nature’s intricate web of interdependent life. Director James Cameron’s message was that human beings CAN live in peace and harmony with other species. The magnificent “Tree of Souls” nurtured the Na’vi people and protected them. In return, these grateful Na’vi maintained the sacred space, worshiped and prayed at their jungle altar. This is literally Mother Nature communicating with her beloved children! Her forest was a living, breathing entity pulsing with life supporting itself. Can you imagine living at this level of consciousness and awareness? And when it was threatened with modern technology, this powerful natural intelligence with help of the Na’vi tribe, fought back in ways that I can’t even adequately describe. You’d have to see the movie.

Back in real life… We don’t exactly live in a world like Pandora, but there is an efficient ecosystem within our earth’s forests called Mycorrhizal Networks. It’s how trees and other plants communicate, and it’s with fungus! But before you scrunch up your nose and say, “Yucch!” just know that we have Mother Trees safeguarding these systems in forests throughout the world. Each one sustains all the other plants by means of a sophisticated network of fungi. These white fungal threads transport critical nutrients underground from overstory trees to roots of seedlings. Walk through a forest and pay close attention to the bustling activity of this mighty matrix… You’ll also see them at work in the movie Avatar. Again, Cameron’s salient message is that we MUST conserve the Mother Tree. Without her our delicate forest ecosystems can’t survive — that’s a sobering fact.

Come see what this strange lifesaver looks like:  http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/magazine/jf11/fungal_systems.asp

You get my drift. Some species don’t need a mouth for talking, ears for hearing, or eyes for seeing for that matter. Most of us have heard of telepathic communication with animals. With plants, it’s much the same. You can simply tune into their frequency, ask a simple question of the flower, bush, fruit tree, and the “answer” comes in feelings and images… It’s a pleasant way to pass the time. Even if you don’t “get anything”, you’ll feel a sense of peace and contentment.

Darwin said our human senses are weak. That may be so, but like muscles you can exercise your senses to make them stronger. There is life teeming all around us, in the earth, up in the trees. Just be aware, engage your 5 senses — See, Hear, Taste, Touch and Smell this incredible natural world. Plants like cabbage can emit a volatile gas, namely “methyl jasmonate”, that warns their vegetative brethren that a herbivore is in the ‘hood — annoying things like caterpillars or garden shears. In flower beds, their roots are clicking merrily away, sending key signals out. Corn husks rub against each other in the fields, creating loud vibrations (gives whole new meaning to “ear of corn”!).

Oh my gosh, we’re living in the midst of a huge biological Internet!!  Kinda makes you want to get out of your chair, go outside and breathe some fresh air. 🙂

So the next time you stop and smell the roses, be sure you speak to them too!